Personal health

Self Care

  • Take a break from social media and stop comparing yourself to your classmates that post their “success.”

    • Just because someone posted good news on their profile, does not mean you’re behind or they’re better than you.

    • How often do people post their rejections? Their failures? The silence on the other side of the line?

    • There’s always going to be that one friend that you can’t believe got a job before you… that doesn’t say anything about you.

  • Find a therapist in your area.

    • Mental health care is just as important as physical, especially during a transitional part of your life.

    • You don’t need to have a diagnosis or mental illness to attend therapy.

    • It can be good to just speak with an unbiased person about what you’re experiencing.

    • You can use search engines like Zocdoc to find a provider.

  • Make sure you are also spending time doing things you love to do.

    • Don’t let the job search consume you, balance it with things to destress and give you a sense of fulfillment.

    • If you want to go to the movies sometimes, go to the movies.

Photo by  Kelly Sikkema  on  Unsplash
  • Exercise!!

    • You will feel so much better everyday if you do. Even if you’re not the type to go to the gym or play a sport, walk around your block a few times. I use Blink Fitness which starts at only $15/month.

  • Bring your lunch from home at work.

    • You’ll save alot of money and control what you’re eating.

  • Get up during your lunch break.

    • Mentally and physically it is important to take breaks.

    • You will improve your productivity if you can take a pause from the project for even a few minutes.

    • If you’re on a time crunch, at least walk to the bathroom and get a drink.

    • You’ll also feel much better and refreshed for when you get back to work.

  • Find a reusable bottle or mug that you really like and will use.

    • It’s important to stay hydrated, especially while job searching or at work. At an office, take advantage of having a water cooler or sink nearby.

  • Get some sleep.

    • Your college days of staying up till 3am are over. You will feel much better and actually be able to function if you are properly rested.

  • Book your annual doctors appointments.

    • Find doctors in your new area.

    • Even if you are not due for an appointment, find one that takes your insurance ahead of time.

    • Zocdoc is an amazing resource that lets you type in your insurance plan and look at a map and find all kinds of doctors. You can even book directly from the website.

  • Understand your health insurance or find an insurance that fits your needs and budget.

  • If you wear contacts and glasses pretty much equally, on move in day, wear contacts because you'll probably get really sweaty.

Food

  • Buy some groceries when you first get there, it's so easy to spend ALOT of money eating out, and justify it from “moving stress.”

    • It’s okay to eat out, especially when you move, but be mindful that it will rack up very quickly in the first few weeks.

Photo by  nrd  on  Unsplash

Photo by nrd on Unsplash

  • Key ingredients to make multiple meals:

    • Cheese, beans, rice, tomatoes, eggs, tortillas - you can make omelettes, burritos, tacos, quesadillas, stir fry, rice and beans, scrambled eggs all from different combinations.

  • Find local fruit stands for cheap fruits and veggies.

    • These places are often sprinkled around the city and near groceries stores. They are much cheaper than stores, and have a wide selection. Note, they are typically cash only. I once got 4 mangos for $2 total near Canal street.

  • Don't skip meals to save money.

  • Always keep some cash on you.

    • Many bars/ bodegas/stands only accept cash.

  • Find healthy recipes you like that you can use for lunch and dinners.

  • Don't let the Trader Joes checkout line freak you out!

    • They are very efficient.

    • If you go with a buddy, they can wait in the line for you.

    • Learn the layout of the store, and save some items to grab for when you are in line.

    • For context: The checkout line snakes through all the food aisles. There is a flag that indicated where to stand to get in line.

  • Cut down on the beer.

  • Take multivitamins to off-set an in-balances you might have if your diet switches while you’re transitioning to a new lifestyle.

  • Don't make it a habit to order food at coffee shops if that's where you're doing work.

    • Good chance you'll be going to a lot of coffee shops to do work and stay focused, and you'll already be buying a drink

  • Take multi vitamins.

    • Your diet probably isn't going to be the best while you're transitioning.

  • Opt to drink water instead of buying other types of sodas or juices.

    • It will keep you hydrated, healthier, and save you a lot of money.

    • Don't get in the habit of buying alot of sodas, juices, beers, teas, and coffees when you first move in if you're trying to save money.

Laundry

  • Get a cart - wet laundry is very heavy.

  • Fold your laundry at the facility.

    • One less thing to do when you get home and you might not have alot of space at home to fold.

    • If there aren’t tables, just fold it as you take it out of the dryer

  • Most places will take quarters or tokens you get there.

    • It will probably cost you between $5-8 total to wash and dry things

  • To avoid ATM fees at the laundromat, get a cashback next time you’re at store. (Trader Joes has that option)

  • Set a timer on your phone so you can pick up your laundry right away.

    • If you leave it attended too long someone might move or steal it.

  • If you are washing at night, check what time the “last wash” is because it will be a different time from closing time.